Testing TLS/SSL encryption

 

testssl.sh

is a free command line tool which checks a server's service on any port for the support of TLS/SSL ciphers, protocols as well as recent cryptographic flaws and more.

NameLast ModifiedSizeType
2.6/ 2018-Nov-15 22:02:23 -- Directory
2.8/ 2018-Nov-15 22:46:12 -- Directory
2.9.5/ 2018-Nov-15 22:24:07 -- Directory
bleichenbacher/ 2018-Feb-23 18:00:33 -- Directory
openssl-1.0.2i-chacha.pm.ipv6.contributed/ 2016-Sep-26 23:15:22 -- Directory
utils/ 2018-Nov-15 22:47:49 -- Directory
 
CREDITS.md 2018-Oct-09 12:36:15 2.65KB MD File
Dockerfile 2018-Oct-09 12:36:15 412.00B Unknown File
LICENSE.txt 2014-May-03 11:04:22 17.59KB TXT Type Document
OPENSSL-LICENSE.txt 2017-May-09 13:14:16 6.13KB TXT Type Document
etc+doc.tar.gz 2018-Nov-15 22:32:16 889.75KB GZ Compressed Archive
openssl-1.0.2k-chacha.pm.ipv6.Linux+FreeBSD.201705.tar.gz 2017-May-12 18:11:02 9.51MB GZ Compressed Archive
openssl-1.0.2k-dev-chacha.pm.ipv6.Linux+FreeBSD.tar.gz 2017-Jul-19 09:28:30 9.51MB GZ Compressed Archive
openssl-iana.mapping.html 2018-Nov-08 20:40:06 59.51KB HTML File
openssl-ms14-066.Linux.x86_64 2016-Apr-15 12:36:23 4.24MB X86_64 File
testssl.1.html 2018-Dec-17 21:11:03 55.38KB HTML File
testssl.sh 2018-Dec-06 11:25:32 879.78KB SH File
testssl_german_owasp_day.pdf 2018-Nov-18 13:53:38 1.11MB PDF Type Document

 

Key features

  • Clear output: you can tell easily whether anything is good or bad
  • Ease of installation: It works for Linux, Mac OSX, FreeBSD and WSL/MSYS2/Cygwin out of the box: no need to install or configure something, no gems, CPAN, pip or the like.
  • Flexibility: You can test any SSL/TLS enabled and STARTTLS service, not only webservers at port 443
  • Toolbox: Several command line options help you to run YOUR test and configure YOUR output
  • Reliability: features are tested thoroughly
  • Verbosity: If a particular check cannot be performed because of a missing capability on your client side, you'll get a warning
  • Privacy: It's only you who sees the result, not a third party
  • Freedom: It's 100% open source. You can look at the code, see what's going on and you can change it. Heck, even the development is open (github)
  • Documentation: Yes!
0 (0)
Article Rating (No Votes)
Rate this article
Attachments
There are no attachments for this article.
Comments
There are no comments for this article. Be the first to post a comment.
Full Name
Email Address
Security Code Security Code
Related Articles RSS Feed
RHEL: Extending the maximum inode count on a ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystem
Viewed 969 times since Sun, May 27, 2018
VMWare tools free
Viewed 1655 times since Mon, Jul 16, 2018
YUM How to use yum command on CentOS/RHEL
Viewed 2066 times since Thu, Oct 25, 2018
12 Linux Rsync Options in Linux Explained
Viewed 664 times since Wed, Oct 31, 2018
ZPOOL: Create a new zpool for zfs filesystems
Viewed 769 times since Sun, Jun 3, 2018
Cron YUM How to use yum-cron to automatically update RHEL/CentOS Linux
Viewed 420 times since Fri, Oct 26, 2018
LVM: Managing snapshots
Viewed 677 times since Sat, Jun 2, 2018
10 nmap Commands Every Sysadmin Should Know
Viewed 573 times since Wed, May 22, 2019
RHEL: Create a local RPM repository
Viewed 1062 times since Sun, May 27, 2018
How to find the largest files and directories in Linux?
Viewed 1022 times since Sun, May 20, 2018