Linux – Securing your important files with XFS extendend attributes

Let’s say, the tnsnames.ora is a quite important file on your system, and you want to make sure that you notice when someone changes the file. Taking a look at the modification time of that file would be good idea, or not?

Per default, the ls -l command show only the (mtime) modification time. In my case, I know that the tnsnames.ora was changed on “Feb 9 11:24″.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] ls -l tnsnames.ora
-rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 1791 Feb  9 11:24 tnsnames.ora

But in reality, more time stamps are stored. The atime, the ctime and the mtime.

  • atime is the access time (only stored in filesystem is not mounted with the noatime option)
  • ctime is the change time, meaning the inode was change, e.g. with the chmod command
  • mtime is the modification time, meaning the content changed

The ctime is often misinterpreted as “creation time”, but this is not the case. The creation time of a file is not recorded with XFS. There are other file systems that can do it, like ZFS, but XFS does not support “creation time”. You can use the stat command to see all time stamps in one shot.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] stat tnsnames.ora
  File: ‘tnsnames.ora’
  Size: 2137            Blocks: 8          IO Block: 4096   regular file
Device: fb02h/64258d    Inode: 163094097   Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (54321/  oracle)   Gid: (54321/oinstall)
Access: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100
Modify: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100
Change: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.254281404 +0100
 Birth: -

Ok. Now someone comes along and changes the tnsnames.ora

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] vi tnsnames.ora

A change was done, and the modification time of that file changed immediately.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] ls -l tnsnames.ora
-rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 2136 Feb  9 11:31 tnsnames.ora

And also other timestamps might have changed like the atime and ctime.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] stat tnsnames.ora
  File: ‘tnsnames.ora’
  Size: 2136            Blocks: 8          IO Block: 4096   regular file
Device: fb02h/64258d    Inode: 161521017   Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (54321/  oracle)   Gid: (54321/oinstall)
Access: 2017-02-09 11:31:06.733673663 +0100
Modify: 2017-02-09 11:31:06.733673663 +0100
Change: 2017-02-09 11:31:06.738673656 +0100
 Birth: -

Cool, now I know that the file was changed at “Feb 9 11:31″. But how reliable is that information? With the touch command, I can easily change the modification time to any value I like. e.g. I can set it to the same date as beforehand.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] touch -m --date="Feb  9 11:24" tnsnames.ora
 
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] ls -l tnsnames.ora
-rw-r--r-- 1 oracle oinstall 2136 Feb  9 11:24 tnsnames.ora

Now I have set the modification time to almost the same value, as it was beforehand. (Almost, because the microseconds are different) Besides that, the access and the change time are different.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] stat tnsnames.ora
  File: ‘tnsnames.ora’
  Size: 2136            Blocks: 8          IO Block: 4096   regular file
Device: fb02h/64258d    Inode: 161521017   Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (54321/  oracle)   Gid: (54321/oinstall)
Access: 2017-02-09 11:31:06.733673663 +0100
Modify: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.000000000 +0100
Change: 2017-02-09 11:36:51.631671612 +0100
 Birth: -

No problem, I can make it even more precise by specifying  the whole date format including microseconds and time zone.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] touch -m --date="2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100" tnsnames.ora
 
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] stat tnsnames.ora
  File: ‘tnsnames.ora’
  Size: 2136            Blocks: 8          IO Block: 4096   regular file
Device: fb02h/64258d    Inode: 161521017   Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (54321/  oracle)   Gid: (54321/oinstall)
Access: 2017-02-09 11:31:06.733673663 +0100
Modify: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100
Change: 2017-02-09 11:39:41.775993054 +0100
 Birth: -

And if I want to, I can even change the access time.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] touch -a --date="2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100" tnsnames.ora
 
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] stat tnsnames.ora
  File: ‘tnsnames.ora’
  Size: 2136            Blocks: 8          IO Block: 4096   regular file
Device: fb02h/64258d    Inode: 161521017   Links: 1
Access: (0644/-rw-r--r--)  Uid: (54321/  oracle)   Gid: (54321/oinstall)
Access: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100
Modify: 2017-02-09 11:24:00.243281419 +0100
Change: 2017-02-09 11:42:22.935350329 +0100
 Birth: -

Only the ctime (change time) is not so easy to change. At least not with the touch command. For changing the ctime you need to invoke the file system debugger or stuff like that. In the end, monitoring my tnsnames.ora file changes by time is not so precise. So why not using the XFS extend attribute feature to help me. e.g. I could create md5 check sums and when the check sum differs, I know that the content was changed. Let’s do it with the root user.

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As root:
 
[root@dbidg03 admin]# getfattr -d tnsnames.ora
[root@dbidg03 admin]#
 
[root@dbidg03 admin]# md5sum tnsnames.ora
d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999  tnsnames.ora
 
[root@dbidg03 admin]# setfattr -n user.md5sum -v d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999 tnsnames.ora
[root@dbidg03 admin]#
[root@dbidg03 admin]# getfattr -d tnsnames.ora
# file: tnsnames.ora
user.md5sum="d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999"

But this is also not so secure. Even if done with root, it can easily be removed by the oracle user.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] getfattr -d tnsnames.ora
# file: tnsnames.ora
user.md5sum="d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999"
 
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] setfattr -x user.md5sum tnsnames.ora
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] getfattr -d tnsnames.ora

To overcome this issue, XFS uses 2 disjoint attribute name spaces associated with every filesystem object. They are the root (or trusted) and user address spaces. The root address space is accessible only to the superuser, and then only by specifying a flag argument to the function call. Other users (like the oracle user in my case) will not see or be able to modify attributes in the root address space. The user address space is protected by the normal file permissions mechanism, so the owner of the file can decide who is able to see and/or modify the value of attributes on any particular file.

Ok. So let’s do it again by using the root (trusted) address space.

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[root@dbidg03 admin]# setfattr -n trusted.md5sum -v "d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999" tnsnames.ora
[root@dbidg03 admin]# getfattr -n trusted.md5sum tnsnames.ora
# file: tnsnames.ora
trusted.md5sum="d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999"

However, from the oracle user point of view, no attributes exist, even if you know the attribute you are looking for.

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oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] getfattr -d tnsnames.ora
oracle@dbidg03:/u01/app/oracle/network/admin/ [rdbms112] getfattr -n trusted.md5sum tnsnames.ora
tnsnames.ora: trusted.md5sum: No such attribute

You can take it even further, but adding another root attribute, e.g. the time when you created the md5 checksum.

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[root@dbidg03 admin]# setfattr -n trusted.md5sumtime -v "09.02.2018 13:00:00" tnsnames.ora
[root@dbidg03 admin]# getfattr -n trusted.md5sumtime tnsnames.ora
# file: tnsnames.ora
trusted.md5sumtime="09.02.2018 13:00:00"
 
[root@dbidg03 admin]# getfattr -n trusted.md5sum tnsnames.ora
# file: tnsnames.ora
trusted.md5sum="d135c0ebf51f68feda895dac8631a999"

Now you have a good chance to find out if the file content was changed or not, by simply checking if the file has a different check sum.

Conclusion

XFS extended attributes are quite powerful features and you can use them in a lot of scenarios. Take care that you have a backup solution that support extended attributes, else you will lose all the information once you restore your data.

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